Life and Immortality – Unamuno versus Nietzsche

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18778/1689-4286.59.02

Keywords:

life, immorality, faith, reason, will, feelings, affirmation, immortality

Abstract

Unamuno and Nietzsche, two eminent representatives of the philosophy of life, are in disagreement over their attitudes to life and, all the more so, to immortality. Nietzsche takes with both hands from the Greek tradition adding to it his vitalism, built on acknowledging the tragic nature of existence and the ethical obligation of its affirmation. Unamuno is a catholic close to the mysticism of the Spanish baroque and contesting the Thomist unifying vision of Christianity, whose dilatory rationalist pragmatism suppresses the emotional-volitional sphere in man. Nietzsche, whose philosophy is popularly considered to be promoting power and dynamics, the two qualities he discovered in nature and transposed into culture, is accused by him of being effeminate and defeatist. Here is a man exalting life, who devises a weird idea of eternal return, probably as an expression of his longing for duration, instead of using a ready made offer of the Christian vision of immortality. Only such person is a true believer in life and its apologist who wants to perpetuate it into eternity and so, a fortiori, is not afraid to risk it as the transient episode. To be true, Nietzsche was not pusillanimous in this respect: he believed that there are values that are nobler than biological subsistence. Unamuno knows about it but still reproaches him, just like Spinoza, for the Stoic approval of death, filtered through rational evaluations. According to him, vitalism is truly manifested only in the discord for death proclaimed by the will. Reason, which is trying to overpower us with the evidence of the necessity of dying, is the power killing the spirit and getting mired in pusillanimity. By entering the marriage with rationality and approving of the finitude of individual existence Nietzsche has contaminated his declarative accession into vitalism. For Unamuno, vital enthusiasm and enthusiasm for life are convincingly verified through the unconditional faith in personal immortality. In the enunciation from Critique de la Modernité, which can be treated as a pendant to the dispute between Unamuno and Nietzsche, Alain Touraine notes that historically, standpoints that escalate the motives of life and desire, frenetic vitalist doctrines, which promote spontaneity and enthusiasm, have turned out to be lacking empathy and inimical to democracy.

 

References

Andreas-Salomé, L. (1983). Friedrich Nietzsche in seinen Werken. Frankfurt am Main: Insel Verlag.
View in Google Scholar

Banasiak, B. (2006). Integralna potworność. Filozofia libertynizmu, czyli konsekwencje „śmierci Boga”. Łódź-Wrocław: Wydawnictwo Thesaurus.
View in Google Scholar

Bataille, G. (2018). Alleluja. Tłum. M. Marczuk. Nowa Orgia Myśli (online).
View in Google Scholar

Bataille, G. (1970). Informe. W: Œuvres complètes (217), t. I. Paris: Gallimard.
View in Google Scholar

Cioran, E. (2006). Zarys rozkładu. Tłum. M. Kowalska. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo KR.
View in Google Scholar

Fontane T. (1982). Effi Briest. Tłum. I. Czermakowa. Warszawa: Książka i Wiedza.
View in Google Scholar

Foucault, M. (2013). Etyka troski o siebie jako praktyka wolności. W: Kim pan jest, profesorze Foucault? (211-238). Tłum. K. M. Jaksender. Kraków: Wydawnictwo Eperons-Ostrogi.
View in Google Scholar

Girard, R. (2006). Początki kultury. Tłum. M. Romanek, Kraków: Wydawnictwo Znak.
View in Google Scholar

Jaspers, K. (2012). Nietzsche. Wprowadzenie do rozumienia jego filozofii. Tłum. D. Stroińska. Łódź: Wydawnictwo Officyna.
View in Google Scholar

Kierkegaard, S. (1976). Diapsalmata. W: Albo-albo, t. 1 (19-47). Tłum. J. Iwaszkiewicz. Warszawa: PWN.
View in Google Scholar

Kierkegaard, S. (1982). Bojaźń i drżenie. Tłum. J. Iwaszkiewicz. Warszawa: PWN.
View in Google Scholar

Klossowski, P. (1999). Sade mój bliźni. Tłum. B. Banasiak, K. Matuszewski. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Aletheia.
View in Google Scholar

Laurent, D. (1973). La Pensée de Nietzsche et l’homme actuel. Toulouse: Edouard Privat Éditeur.
View in Google Scholar

Leopardi, G. (1998). Rozmowa Torquata Tassa z jego rodzinnym duchem opiekuńczym. W: Dziełka moralne (72-79). Tłum. St. Kasprzysiak. Kraków: Oficyna Literacka.
View in Google Scholar

Lévinas, E. (1997). Całość i nieskończoność. Tłum. M. Kowalska. Warszawa: PWN.
View in Google Scholar

Lévinas, E. (2000). Inaczej niż być lub poza istotą. Tłum. P. Mrówczyński. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Aletheia.
View in Google Scholar

Löwith, K. (2001). Od Hegla do Nietzschego. Rewolucyjny przełom w myśli XIX wieku. Tłum. St. Gromadzki. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo KR.
View in Google Scholar

Onfray, M. (2008). Traktat ateologiczny. Fizyka metafizyki. Tłum. M. Kwaterko. Warszawa: PIW.
View in Google Scholar

Polit, K. (2018). Bóg, człowiek i śmierć. Poglądy filozoficzne późnego Miguela de Unamuno. Lublin: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej.
View in Google Scholar

Św. Teresa z Awili (1995). Poezje. W: Dzieła, t. III (232-272). Tłum. H. P. Kossowski. Kraków: Wydawnictwo O. O. Karmelitów Bosych.
View in Google Scholar

Tołstoj, L. (2014). Przemoc. W: Droga życia (217-241). Tłum. A. Kunicka. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Aletheia.
View in Google Scholar

Touraine, A. (1992). Critique de la Modernité. Paris: Fayard.
View in Google Scholar

Unamuno de, M. (1984). O poczuciu tragiczności życia wśród ludzi i wśród narodów. Tłum. H. Woźniakowski. Kraków-Wrocław: Wydawnictwo Literackie.
View in Google Scholar

Weil, S. (2004). Na czym polega płynące z Langwedocji natchnienie? W: Dzieła (601-610). Tłum. M. Frankiewicz. Poznań: Brama. Książnica Włóczęgów i Uczonych.
View in Google Scholar

Published

2023-01-18

Issue

Section

Articles