Play the art: Artistic value in video games

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18778/2391-8551.08.02

Keywords:

art, immersion, feedback loop, feelings

Abstract

Playing a game does not mean that we are doing something childish and useless. Using a new technology to express our feelings and raise the awareness of social issues does not mean we cannot call it art. If we go back in time, we can realize that there has always been a resistance to novelty and machines. Sometimes, they were even considered harmful. The same life cycle happens with video games: they are valuable in many ways, they are far more developed than they were twenty years ago, and they have even reached a stage where we can find art in them. But how can they be art? Is the answer in the story or in the audiovisual elements?  

Author Biography

Klaudia Jancsovics, University of Szeged

Klaudia Jancsovics – is a doctoral student at the University of Szeged in the Department of Comparative Literature. Her research belongs to game studies, and she examines video games with the methods of literary and film studies. Her aim is to prove that video games can tell stories in unique, interactive ways while using the methods of literary writings and films. So far, she has published several studies focusing on different video games (e.g., Heavy Rain, Detroit: Become Human) and various approaches (like the characteristics of detective stories, movie language, or horror stories in video games). She has also been interested in narratology, game studies, digital humanities, intermediality, and film studies.  

References

Anable, A. (2019). Playing with Feelings. Video Games and Affect. Minneapolis, London: University of Minnesota Press. https://doi.org/10.5749/j.ctt20mvgwg
Google Scholar DOI: https://doi.org/10.5749/j.ctt20mvgwg

Benjamin, W. (2005). Little History of Photography. In M.W. Jennings, G. Smith, H. Eiland (eds.), Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings. Volume 2: Part 2: 1931–1934 (pp. 507–531). Belknap Press.
Google Scholar

Benjamin, W. (2006). The Work of Art in the Age of Its Technological Reproducibility: Third Version. In H. Eiland, M.W. Jennings (eds.), Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings. Volume 4: 1938–1940 (pp. 251–284). Belknap Press.
Google Scholar

Galloway, A. (2006). Gaming Essays on Algorithmic Culture. Minneapolis, London: University of Minnesota Press.
Google Scholar

Huizinga, J. (1949). Homo Ludens. A Study of the Play-Element in Culture. London, Boston, Henley: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
Google Scholar

Kravtsov, Y. (2014). Investigating the Story of The Vanishing of Ethan Carter [SPOILERS!]. Leaden.ru. https://leaden.ru/2014/10/investigating-the-story-of-the-vanishing-of-ethan-carter-spoilers/ (accessed on June 20, 2022).
Google Scholar

Mäyrä, F. (2008). An Introduction to Game Studies. Games in Culture. Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, Singapore: SAGE Publications. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446214572
Google Scholar DOI: https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446214572

Moholy-Nagy, L. (1969). Painting, Photography, Film. London: Lund Humphries.
Google Scholar

Murray, J.H. (2016). Hamlet on the Holodeck. The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace. New York, London, Toronto, Sydney, Singapore: The Free Press.
Google Scholar

Salen, K., & Zimmerman, E. (2004). Rules of Play. Game Design Fundamentals. Cambridge, MA, London, England: The MIT Press.
Google Scholar

Sharp, J. (2015). Works of Game. On the Aesthetics of Games and Art. Cambridge, MA, London, England: The MIT Press.
Google Scholar

Solarski, C. (2012). Drawing Basics and Video Game Art. Classic to Cutting-Edge Art Techniques for Winning Video Game Design. Watson-Guptill Publications.
Google Scholar

Solarski, C. (2017). Interactive Stories and Video Game Art. A Storytelling Framework for Game Design. Boca Raton, London, New York: Taylor & Francis Group, CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b21636
Google Scholar DOI: https://doi.org/10.1201/b21636

Soulban, L., & Orkin, H. (2009). Writing for First-Person Shooters. In W. Despain (ed.), Writing for Video Game Genres. From FRP to RPG (pp. 51–67). A K Peters, Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1201/b10641-7
Google Scholar DOI: https://doi.org/10.1201/b10641-7

Waugh, P. (2011). Metafiction. The Theory and Practice of Self-Conscious Fiction. Taylor & Francis e-Library.
Google Scholar

Krillbite Studio (2015). Among the Sleep [PlayStation 4]. Krillbite Studio.
Google Scholar

Lewandowska, W., & Frydrysiak S. (2020). Nightsss [VR]. Realized in the Visual Narrative Lab at the National Film School in Łódź.
Google Scholar

Quantic Dream (2018). Detroit: Become Human [PlayStation 4]. Sony Interactive Entertainment.
Google Scholar

Respawn Entertainment (2016) Titanfall 2. [PlayStation 4]. Electronic Arts.
Google Scholar

Santa Monica Studio (2018). God of War [PlayStation 4]. Sony Interactive Entertainment.
Google Scholar

The Astronauts (2015). The Vanishing of Ethan Carter [PlayStation 4]. The Astronauts.
Google Scholar

Heap (2021). Among the Sleep Wiki. Retrieved from https://among-the-sleep-game.fandom.com/wiki/Among_The_Sleep_Wiki
Google Scholar

McCreary, B. (n.d.). Interview retrieved from https://bearmccreary.com/Music/god-of-war/
Google Scholar

Mission (n.d.). BAFTA. Retrieved from https://www.bafta.org/asia/about/organisation-mission; https://www.bafta.org/
Google Scholar

The Characters of God of War ft. Rafael Grassetti & Dela Longfish (2018). You-Tube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPdFkm1xLaI&ab_channel=Gnomon
Google Scholar

Zip-Scene Conference (2021). Retrieved from https://zip-scene.mome.hu/2021/
Google Scholar

Downloads

Published

2022-07-14

How to Cite

Jancsovics, K. (2022). Play the art: Artistic value in video games. Replay. The Polish Journal of Game Studies, 8(1), 27–42. https://doi.org/10.18778/2391-8551.08.02

Issue

Section

Articles